(T+A #24) Technology and the Arts: 12/5/2007

(T+A #24) Technology and the Arts: 12/5/2007

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, we will discuss some interesting news, web sites and online resources we have come across recently, including FoodTube.net, art inspired by spam subject lines (see example at right), recreations of iconic photographs featuring senior citizens, and six things to be thankful for in technology. Plus, we’ll take a look at Pandora’s new classical music service and Google’s upcoming online storage utility. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 13 MB. Time: 28 min., 15 sec.

(T+A #12) Technology and the Arts: 6/6/2007

(T+A #12) Technology and the Arts: 6/6/2007

Janie Hermann and Evan Klimpl of the Princeton (N.J.) Public Library’s Poetry Podcast are interviewed, continuing a conversation from the May 16 podcast. Other topics of discussion include the Microsoft Milan Surface Computer, Pandora’s leap from the PC and the latest on webcasting royalty rates. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 9.6 MB. Time: 20 min., 51 sec.

(T+A #10) Technology and the Arts: 5/2/2007

(T+A #10) Technology and the Arts: 5/2/07

Exhibitors and attendees at the 32nd Annual Trenton Computer Festival in Central New Jersey are interviewed. Other topics include Sacramento Bee photographer Renee C. Byer’s award-winning work at Pulitzer.org, a toaster pastry review at tackyliving.com, Google’s announced presentation applicationk, Wisegeek.com’s “How to make your offline life easier,” Boston Cyberarts 2007, PoliSciFi at thepartyparty.com, and musician/blogger/podcaster Jonathan Coulton. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 14 MB. Time: 30 min., 47 sec.

Show Notes for Technology and the Arts Podcast #10

MARCH booth at Trenton Computer Festival

Exhibitors and attendees at the 32nd Annual Trenton Computer Festival in Central New Jersey are interviewed. Other topics include Sacramento Bee photographer Renee C. Byer’s award-winning work at Pulitzer.org, a toaster pastry review at tackyliving.com, Google’s announced presentation applicationk, Wisegeek.com’s “How to make your offline life easier,” Boston Cyberarts 2007, PoliSciFi at thepartyparty.com, and musician/blogger/podcaster Jonathan Coulton. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 14 MB. Time: 29 min., 10 sec.

Featured Link

  • Trenton Computer Festival 2007Technology and the Arts co-host John LeMasney gave a presentation on blogging and podcasting at the festival. Then, John and Brian walked the floor at the indoor computer show and interviewed some attendees and exhibitors.

Other links related to this episode:

Photos from the 2007 Trenton Computer Festival

MITS Altair 680 atop vintage Zenith Data Systems computer.

The photo above shows an Altair 680 sitting atop a vintage Zenith Data Systems machine. These were two of several vintage computers at the Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists (MARCH) booth this past weekend during the 32nd Annual Trenton Computer Festival, held at The College of New Jersey in Ewing, N.J.

Click here for more photos from the 2007 Trenton Computer Festival.

(NOTE: I’ll try to add captions and information about the photos at some point).

Help Key: Home Recording, Part II

This is a fun article that talks about a good-low-cost-but-quality setup for audio production in your own recording studio. If this isn’t appropriate info for the technology and the arts crowd, what is? I like that is involves an actual hardware mixer and our in-house favorite open source audio champion hero editor Audacity

Help Key: Home Recording, Part II
I live in a neighborhood of burgeoning artists and musicians, and an endless stream of people ask me, “How do I set up a cheap, quick, and easy home recording studio?” I’ve actually got it down to a science at this point, so here it is. Keep in mind that your favorite indie rock band has probably used a less sophisticated setup. I recently spoke with Sam Endicott of The Bravery, and he says the band recorded its first album in band members’ bedrooms.

YouTube – Philips: Drag & Draw Technology Dijital Boyama

YouTube – Philips: Drag & Draw Technology Dijital Boyama

This is a quick video of a boy drawing on a wall. Wait a second: he’s drawing with light. It appears to be the same technology that allows SMART boards to work, where a projector and a whiteboard work in tandem to allow changes to appear on screen where a user makes connections on the whiteboard. The business meeting applications for SMART boards are fairly obvious, like making markups on a powerpoint slide, saving those markings to a file for review later, etc., but this has a much simpler killer app – using light as a fun way to make marks on a wall. However, I could see someone like Bill Viola or Bruce Nauman making great use of this as a serious art making tool.

Wired News: Make Beautiful Brain Music

This wired article discusses what might happen if PLOrk decided to give up the keyboard interface with their laptops, and plug directly in!

Wired News: Make Beautiful Brain Music
Move over, woodwind and strings — in the future, the ultimate musical instrument could be the human brain.

Artist Luciana Haill uses medical electroencephalogram, or EEG, monitors embedded in a Bluetooth-enabled sweatband to record the activity of her frontal lobes, then beams the data to a computer that plays it back as song.

Now Haill is taking her gig on the road, joining 30 experimental artists this week to showcase creative and wacky new audio technologies on the Future of Sound tour of England. Audience members will be asked to don the electrodes so they can jointly think up a harmony.

“The brain operates in the same units sound waves are measured in — hertz,” said Haill. “You’re getting raw data from the prefrontal cortex but feeding it through software — a little bit from the left hemisphere and a little bit from the right.”

A look at Apple’s iPhone

Posted by: Brian
Apple iPhone
At long last, Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the much-heralded iPhone during today’s Macworld keynote address in San Francisco.

While I don’t want to make this site too commercial, I find it hard not to consider the iPhone an appropriate combination of technology and art.

So, if you want to learn more about the iPhone, here is what Apple has to say.

That being said, I would almost guarantee John and I will be at least mentioning the iPhone in a future “Technology & the Arts” podcast.

Apple also detailed its Apple TV device that creates a wireless connection between one’s iTunes video library and television set (as well as other PCs), and officially changed its name from Apple Computer, Inc., to Apple, Inc.

(Photo: Apple, Inc.)