Pandora on verge of “pull-the-plug kind of decision”

Save Net Radio!

Save Net Radio!

I guess the battle to save Internet radio being waged in Washington, D.C., proves that common sense — for the most part — doesn’t really exist within the infamous beltway.

Apparently, the efforts by our friends at Pandora and other music webcasters to come to an agreement on lower royalty rates other than those proposed by SoundExchange and approved by the Copyright Royalty Board last year have gone absolutely nowhere.

And it looks as if the end of webcasting is approaching, according to these articles:

Giant of Internet radio nears its ‘last stand’ – Washington Post

Pandora Internet Radio to Go Silent? – I4U News

Web radio is toast – The Inquirer

This basically stinks.

For more about the battle to save Internet radio, visit SaveNetRadio.org.

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(T+A #36) Technology and the Arts: 6/4/2008

(T+A #36) Technology and the Arts: 6/4/2008

Note: Sorry this podcast is late…I had a bit of a mishap during some last-minute editing, requiring me to do some re-recording of some portions. – BK

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, we share some interesting news, web sites and online resources we have come across recently, including Weezer’s “Pork and Beans” video featuring your favorite YouTube celebrities, YouTube’s long-awaited formal response to Viacom’s lawsuit against the site, and a YouTube controversy involving Prince and Radiohead. Plus, we discuss the wonders of Gmaps Pedometer, a self-described Google Maps hack that is useful for walkers and runners. Hosts: Brian Kelley and John LeMasney. File size: 7 MB. Time: 14 min., 33 sec.

Show Notes for Technology and the Arts Podcast #36

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, we share some interesting news, web sites and online resources we have come across recently, including Weezer’s “Pork and Beans” video featuring your favorite YouTube celebrities, YouTube’s long-awaited formal response to Viacom’s lawsuit against the site, and a YouTube controversy involving Prince and Radiohead. Plus, we discuss the wonders of Gmaps Pedometer, a self-described Google Maps hack that is useful for walkers and runners. Hosts: Brian Kelley and John LeMasney. File size: 7 MB. Time: 14 min., 33 sec.

Note: Sorry this podcast is late…I had a bit of a mishap during some last-minute editing, requiring me to do some re-recording of some portions. – BK

Related Links:

Show Notes for Technology and the Arts Podcast #33

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, we share some interesting news, web sites and online resources we have come across recently, including Flickr’s addition of video hosting and another user revolt; and MySong, an experimental project allowing users to write basic songs with their voices. Plus, we’ll discuss the New York Mets getting Rick-Rolled by Internet users, and more. Hosts: Brian Kelley and John LeMasney. File size: 10 MB. Time: 21 min., 05 sec.

Related Links:

(Photo: Gothamist)

(T+A #25) Technology and the Arts: 12/19/2007

(T+A #25) Technology and the Arts: 12/19/2007

Barbara Mink, director and founder of the Light in Winter Festival in Ithaca, N.Y., discusses the annual event celebrating the synergies of science and the arts in this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast. Other topics of discussion include year-end “top 10” lists, Christmas stories on OldRadioFun.com, the RIAA’s unfair view of “fair use,” and social music site iLike.com. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 15 MB. Time: 30 min., 30 sec.

NOTE: Once again, I had to correct something in the audio file for this podcast. If you downloaded it before 11 p.m. ET on 12/20/07, you may want to try it again for the best possible version. Sorry about that. Oh, and I do know that I say at the end of this podcast that our next show will be Wednesday, January 9, 2007…instead of 2008…d’oh! – Brian

Show Notes for Technology and the Arts Podcast #25

Barbara Mink, director and founder of the Light in Winter Festival in Ithaca, N.Y., discusses the annual event celebrating the synergies of science and the arts in this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast. Other topics of discussion include year-end “top 10” lists, Christmas stories on OldRadioFun.com, the RIAA’s unfair view of “fair use”, and social music site iLike.com. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 15 MB. Time: 30 min., 30 sec.

Featured Story:

  • Light in Winter FestivalBarbara Mink, director and founder of the Light in Winter Festival in Ithaca, N.Y., talks about this annual event celebrating the synergies of science and the arts. This year’s event takes place January 18-20, 2008. Watch the promotional video at the bottom of this post.

Related Links:

  • crumb.tumblr.com – John LeMasney’s tumble log.
  • bktandem.tumblr.com – Brian Kelley’s tumble log.
  • John and Brian reflect on one year of producing the Technology and the Arts podcast.
  • Changes are coming for lemasney.com because…
  • …John is moving entirely off Windows at home and going all Linux!
  • Brian and John once again thank Pandora, the Urban Saloon in Philadelphia and Bud Select for a great time out on Dec. 5.
  • John talks about a recent presentation by DJ Sakuramboo at a recent Linux Users Group in Princeton (LUG/IP) meeting in which he turned a terminatorx/aldrin demonstration into a 40-minute performance. Check out David A. Harding’s blog post featuring a description and photos of the event.
  • John Time Magazine’s list of “50 Top 10 Lists.”
  • Since we’re in the season, try to listen to some Christmas stories on OldRadioFun.com.
  • John searches the Internet for new pizza dough recipes, like this one…and this one.
  • Brian takes one more shot at the Recording Industry Association of America — the RIAA, for short — in 2007, as it continues to insist that ripping a CD that you legally purchased onto your computer as a backup or to put on your MP3 player is the same as stealing music.
  • And since we are in the final days of the holiday season, check out Ars Technica’s holiday hardware guide.
  • If you are a creative person and need better time management skills, check out a free ebook called “Time Management for Creative People.”
  • Social music site iLike.com has already made it big on Facebook. Now, it plans on dominating the music scene across the entire social networking universe.
  • Check out the Technology and the Arts Events page.
  • Also, just to be clear, at the end of this podcast, I say that our next show will be Wednesday, January 9, 2007…obviously, I meant to say 2008. Sorry about that.

Promotional video for Light in Winter…


Link

Pandora Presents at the Urban Saloon

At the risk of repeating myself, Brian and I had a lot of fun on Wednesday night at the Urban Saloon in Philadelphia talking with Pandora users at the Pandora Presents get together.

Pandora, ( http://pandora.com ) for those of you who might not know, is an online music service that allows you to log in and create ‘radio stations’ that you program to your own tastes.

In Pandora, in each station, you start with a song, and as a song finishes, another song starts. You thumbs-up songs that you like, and you thumbs-down songs that you don’t.  Each vote shapes the musical taste in your radio station. By voting, you also inform the Music Genome Project about someone who likes songs a, b, and f, but not g, j, or t.

The more users who vote, the more likely that the music that Pandora suggests for you to listen to (tuned by you and influenced by others who tune their stations in similar ways) is enjoyable, interesting, and surprising.

They also allow people to advertise their stations to others, and create multiple stations, so I might have a lemasney approved jazz station, a rock based holiday songs station, and a drum and bass club mix. Or, I could just find others’ existing shared stations that meet those needs.

They also just recently added classical music to the stations, so the music is becoming more and more diverse, just the way we like it.
It’s a fun way to listen to music, a great way to find new sounds that you are likely to enjoy, and a great form of social collective work that influences on both an individual and a group level.

Special thanks to Kevin Seal, the host of the evening, and Chris McGrew, for stopping by to converse with Technology and the Arts. Go, Griddle!