Show Notes for Technology and the Arts Podcast #45

Note: Sorry for the delay in getting these Show Notes online…but better late than never…and Go Phillies!

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, we share some interesting news, web sites and online resources we have come across recently, including enhancements to TiVo, the Tekzilla podcast, the Netflix set-top box developed by Roku, and a Picasa Web Album update. Plus, we’ll discuss an RIAA setback and some digital music royalty decisions involving Pandora and iTunes. In addition, we discuss John’s recently stolen car…and more! Hosts: Brian Kelley and John LeMasney. File size: 16 MB. Time: 34 min., 45 sec.

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Here are some things John talked about:

  • Educause – Educause 2008, a conference dedicated to the use of information technology in higher education, will take place in Orlando, Florida, Oct. 28-31, 2008.
  • Presidium – An IT help desk solution that John checked out during a recent business trip to Kentucky.
  • Bella Vista Beverage – John visited this South Philly beer and soda distributor to help celebrate its grand reopening on Sunday, Oct. 5…
  • …and then John had his car stolen while he was there. If anyone sees a 2005 silver Toyota Sienna minivan — possibly still with the New Jersey plates on it — in the South Philly area, please contact us at technology.arts@gmail.com.
  • T-Mobile G1 – John talked more about this Google Android-powered phone from T-Mobile.
  • Garmin Nuvi – John had a good experience with this GPS device while on his trip to Kentucky.
  • The Aleuminati – The “not-so secret” society of beer drinkers.
  • Budweiser American Ale – John recently reviewed this latest offering from Budweiser…and he doesn’t think it’s all that bad.
  • Avery Brewing – At the other end of the beer spectrum from Bud’s American Ale are Avery’s The Maharaja and Salvation.
  • TiVo – John discusses a recent update to this fantastic technology.
  • Tekzilla – A Revision3 podcast hosted by Patrick Norton and Veronica Belmont.
  • Netflix Player by Roku – John talks about this set-top box that streams Netflix movies directly to your television.
  • Picasa 3 – Google has updated its Picasa Web Album and John likes the new features.
  • Neat Company – Simple, efficient paper scanning solutions.

Here are some things Brian talked about:

  • Philadelphia Phillies – Brian is completely preoccupied by his favorite sports team’s playoff run to the National League Championship Series.
  • Christian Beach – Brian plugs some upcoming shows by his friend Christian…October 23 at Triumph Brew Pub in Princeton, N.J.; October 29 at Triumph in Philadelphia, Pa.; and December 5 at Fergie’s Pub in Philly.
  • RIAA suffers legal setback – A federal judge in Minnesota threw out a $222,000 verdict against single mother Jammie Thomas, who had convicted of illegally sharing songs on a peer-to-peer file sharing service. The judge ordered a new trial. (Source: Information Week)
  • Congress passes webcasting bill – Both houses of Congress passed legislation that will help webcasters like Pandora and Live365 reach a deal on reasonable royalty rates with SoundExchange, the organization charged with collecting royalties from digital music. Read more here and here. (Sources: Pandora, AP via Google)
  • Royalty rate unchanged for iTunes, other download services – After Apple threatened to shut down the iTunes Music Store if royalty rates were increased, the Copyright Royalty Board decided to keep mechanical royalty rates (for songwriters and publishers) at 9.1¢ per download. There was speculation that the rate could increase to around 15¢ per download. (Source: Ars Technica)
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Pandora on verge of “pull-the-plug kind of decision”

Save Net Radio!

Save Net Radio!

I guess the battle to save Internet radio being waged in Washington, D.C., proves that common sense — for the most part — doesn’t really exist within the infamous beltway.

Apparently, the efforts by our friends at Pandora and other music webcasters to come to an agreement on lower royalty rates other than those proposed by SoundExchange and approved by the Copyright Royalty Board last year have gone absolutely nowhere.

And it looks as if the end of webcasting is approaching, according to these articles:

Giant of Internet radio nears its ‘last stand’ – Washington Post

Pandora Internet Radio to Go Silent? – I4U News

Web radio is toast – The Inquirer

This basically stinks.

For more about the battle to save Internet radio, visit SaveNetRadio.org.

Pandora Presents at the Urban Saloon

At the risk of repeating myself, Brian and I had a lot of fun on Wednesday night at the Urban Saloon in Philadelphia talking with Pandora users at the Pandora Presents get together.

Pandora, ( http://pandora.com ) for those of you who might not know, is an online music service that allows you to log in and create ‘radio stations’ that you program to your own tastes.

In Pandora, in each station, you start with a song, and as a song finishes, another song starts. You thumbs-up songs that you like, and you thumbs-down songs that you don’t.  Each vote shapes the musical taste in your radio station. By voting, you also inform the Music Genome Project about someone who likes songs a, b, and f, but not g, j, or t.

The more users who vote, the more likely that the music that Pandora suggests for you to listen to (tuned by you and influenced by others who tune their stations in similar ways) is enjoyable, interesting, and surprising.

They also allow people to advertise their stations to others, and create multiple stations, so I might have a lemasney approved jazz station, a rock based holiday songs station, and a drum and bass club mix. Or, I could just find others’ existing shared stations that meet those needs.

They also just recently added classical music to the stations, so the music is becoming more and more diverse, just the way we like it.
It’s a fun way to listen to music, a great way to find new sounds that you are likely to enjoy, and a great form of social collective work that influences on both an individual and a group level.

Special thanks to Kevin Seal, the host of the evening, and Chris McGrew, for stopping by to converse with Technology and the Arts. Go, Griddle!

(T+A #21) Technology and the Arts: 10/18/2007

(T+A #21) Technology and the Arts: 10/18/2007

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, we will discuss some interesting news, web sites and online resources we have come across recently, including the top 100 open-source applications for Macs and recent developments regarding the RIAA. Plus, we’ll remember two people who have recently passed away: John’s friend Chris Hill and Rider University professor of political science and noted political analyst David Rebovich. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 15 MB. Time: 31 min., 14 sec.

(T+A #16) Technology and the Arts: 8/1/2007

(T+A #16) Technology and the Arts: 8/1/2007

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, topics of discussion include a Wired How-to wiki on “How to Explain DRM to Your Dad,” a guide to photographer’s rights, 10 ways to become a self-taught master through autodidacticism, an IT professional who wrote a book on his cell phone during his daily commute, and WXPN’s upcoming countdown of the 885 Most Memorable Musical Moments…plus more. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 10 MB. Time: 21 min., 20 sec.

Show Notes for Technology and the Arts Podcast #16

NOTE: I apologize for being a day late with this…we tried yet another way to record our conversation — this time using Apple’s iChat. Thankfully, I saved a copy of the GarageBand file because I had to refer to that file more than once to rebuild some recordings that I had inadvertently lost during the editing process. So between editing delays and not being around an Internet connection last night, I didn’t have much of a chance to get this online. – Brian

In this installment of the Technology and the Arts podcast, topics of discussion include a Wired How-to wiki on “How to Explain DRM to Your Dad,” a guide to photographer’s rights, 10 ways to become a self-taught master through autodidacticism, an IT professional who wrote a book on his cell phone during his daily commute, and WXPN’s upcoming countdown of the 885 Most Memorable Musical Moments…plus more. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 10 MB. Time: 21 min., 20 sec.

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(T+A #15) Technology and the Arts: 7/18/2007

(T+A #15) Technology and the Arts: 7/18/2007

Guest Tim Westergren, founder of the Pandora online music service, makes his second appearance on the Technology and the Arts podcast to provide an update on the fight to save Internet radio. Other topics of discussion include the Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network, StereoGum.com’s tribute to Radiohead’s “OK Computer,” InviteShare.com, The Hype Machine and more. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 14.5 MB. Time: 31 min., 30 sec.