(T+A #4) Technology and the Arts: 2/7/2007

(T+A #4) Technology and the Arts: 2/7/2007

Rider University professors Donald Ambrose and Sigfredo Hernandez, and our very own John LeMasney, an instructional technologist at Rider, are interviewed about a project there involving the visual metaphor teaching strategy and the GNU Image Manipulation Program. Other topics discussed are the UbuntuStudio project, Midomi.com, University of Pennsylvania radio station WXPN, and more. File size: 18.7 MB. Time: 38 min., 55 sec. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney.

Show Notes for Technology & the Arts Podcast #4

In the fourth installment of the “Technology and the Arts” podcast, Rider University professors Donald Ambrose and Sigfredo Hernandez, and our very own John LeMasney, an instructional technologist at Rider, are interviewed about a project there involving the visual metaphor teaching strategy and the GNU Image Manipulation Program. Other topics discussed are the UbuntuStudio project, Midomi.com, University of Pennsylvania radio station WXPN, and more. Hosts: Brian Kelley, John LeMasney. File size: 16.7 MB. Time: 38 min., 55 sec.

Links related to this episode:

Stephen P. Jobs pulls a Richard M. Stallman

Steve Jobs, of Apple Inc., has stated the seemingly impossible when he says that DRM on media should be abolished. In case you’re wondering, my mention of Stallman in the title refers to the Free Software Foundation’s recent push to abolish DRM from GPL 3 licensed software. Anyhoo, in his post up on apple.com, a lengthy essay that is igniting the blogosphere, Steve says that the time has come for music companies to let go of their shackles on the media they produce, because it does nothing but hurt their industry. When the thousands of music lovers said it, it seemed to go unnoticed by the industry, but this is one voice they’ll undoubtedly hear. Kudos Mr. Jobs.

Apple – Thoughts on Music
The third alternative is to abolish DRMs entirely. Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats. In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. If the big four music companies would license Apple their music without the requirement that it be protected with a DRM, we would switch to selling only DRM-free music on our iTunes store. Every iPod ever made will play this DRM-free music.