A constitution in the digital world, the digital freedom campaign – Perspectives

Posted by: Brian

The following was written by Colin Loretz for The Nevada Sagebrush, the student newspaper of the University of Nevada, Reno…

A constitution in the digital world, the digital freedom campaign – Perspectives

It is your right to be able to take advantage of the newest emerging technologies that are designed to help you innovate and create new things. These issues have been brought before Congress by corporate lobbyists who describe the problem as a battle between artists and pirates, when it is really a matter of consumers and their First Amendment rights of speech and creative expression.

The Digital Freedom campaign has been established to target legislation and lawsuits designed to place restrictions and impose excessive fees on technologies that allow individuals to enjoy lawfully obtained media content. The campaign is composed of more than a dozen organizations, film producers, independent recording artists and electronics and computer manufacturers who seek to educate artists, parents, students and other consumers about the legislation that threaten to revoke individuals’ rights to use digital technology…

Visit www.digitalfreedom.org for more information.

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4 thoughts on “A constitution in the digital world, the digital freedom campaign – Perspectives

  1. Very interesting. I’m glad you posted this. It’s a lot to think about.
    This quote, though, only leaves me with more questions: “…a battle between artists and pirates, when it is really a matter of consumers and their First Amendment rights of speech and creative expression….”

    Who decides what is the “correct” characterization of the battle? In the digital world, is everything existing to be consumed and archived?

    I’m asking these questions of you not so much to be a “devil’s advocate”, so much as to really learn. I honestly come away from reading this with more questions than I had going in.

    Which is maybe a good thing, maybe the whole point?

    I’m here to learn.

  2. mannabozo,

    Thank you for your comments.

    I’m not quite sure the full article makes a strong case for the Digital Freedom campaign, but I felt the two paragraphs I posted put a rightful stress on the Digital Freedom campaign.

    I think the actual DigitalFreedom.org Web site makes it a lot clearer in regards to what the battle is all about. I would suggest going right to the source.

    I’m just happy that somebody wrote about this.

    – Brian

  3. I know this seems dated but I just found your blog and am glad to see you were interested in my article. Technology is changing the way we do things and the Digital Freedom Campaign fights to retain your rights.

    “I’m not quite sure the full article makes a strong case for the Digital Freedom campaign, but I felt the two paragraphs I posted put a rightful stress on the Digital Freedom campaign.” As the writer of this article, I’m not afraid to agree with you. I first became aware of Digital Freedom at CES 2007 and wrote the article in January based solely on press releases and my own knowledge of the industy.

    After publishing that article, I was contacted by representatives at Digital Freedom and have since learned a lot more about the program. I have also provided them with input in order to establish Digital Freedom Chapters within College and University communities. They recently put out a press release explaining their university initiative: http://www.digitalfreedom.org/PressRelease.action?id=38.

    Colin Loretz
    Web & Technology Editor
    The Nevada Sagebrush

    p.s. My original article appears to be defunct as a result of migration to a new website.

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